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The Gruffalo's Child

A classic for sure, this story follows on from the infamous 'The Gruffalo.'  It's hard to fathom that it was only Julia's second picture book.

Delving deeper into the character who captured the imagination of so many children, Julia now focuses the story from the view point of the gruffalo.  The book opens with the gruffalo tucked up in his cave with his child - hence the title.  Look carefully at the cave paintings, Axel Scheffler's trade mark witty illustrations are evident from the beginning in this one.  It is now the gruffalo's child who ventures into the forest, all the time mindful of the stories he has heard of the big bad mouse.

We love the rhyming pattern to this, making it perfect for bedtime reading.  The quirky pictures are great on their own - with the stickman (star of another book by this author) appearing on many of the pages.

 

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Publisher Blurb
One dark night the Gruffalo's child disobeys her father’s warnings and ventures out into the snow. After all, the Big Bad Mouse doesn’t really exist . . . does he?

Nitty Gritty

Format
Paperback
Pages
32
ISBN
978-1405020466

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Reader Age

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The Gruffalo's Child 2012-01-08 23:12:04 Jodie
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5.0
Reviewed by Jodie    January 09, 2012

Gruffalo's child

Although I had heard of Julia Donaldson’s The Gruffalo I have to confess I was not familiar with the story until we had the chance to see the film screened over Christmas last year – and what a lovely adaptation it is. So it was with great enthusiasm we welcomed the chance to review The Gruffalo’s Child and the LBBC Activity Time sheet this month.
There’s a lot for a youngster to like about this book – the innate curiosity piqued by a parent’s recollections, the mystery of an unknown beast, the late night expedition into the snow alone and above all the chance to be brave (better yet the safety of knowing that when no longer brave there is somewhere safe and warm to snuggle up).
Axel Scheffler’s winter wonderland illustrations evoke the magic of a snow covered Narnia with forest creatures lurking in trees and corners complementing the action of the main characters. I love that the Gruffalo’s child is neither recognisably a he nor a she (although she is referred to in the text) and I love the wide eyed excitement of the characters as is trade mark Scheffler work.
Whilst the book builds on the characters and story lines of the original Gruffalo it also stands alone as a charming and engaging read. The curiosity of the Gruffalo’s child is a perfect complement for the feisty, resourceful and quick thinking mouse and Donaldson’s rhyming text is a lovely way to meet snake, owl and fox and follow the Gruffalo’s child’s adventure.
I have to admit that I prefer the original – but here’s the thing – my son prefers The Gruffalo’s Child and we all know whose preference matters most. The fact that this timeless classic has reinvigorated itself with a character so easily related to by young readers is the magic of an author who not only creates an enchanting story but can do so with the true target audience in mind.
I‘d say The Gruffalo’s Child is good, real good – but then I can hear the mouse reply indignantly

‘Good – don’t call me good!’

This book is an excellent read and one your young adventurers will enjoy!

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The Gruffalo's Child 2011-11-30 11:25:35 nabbu
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4.0
Reviewed by nabbu    November 30, 2011

Another masterpiece!

A great prelude to the original classic. Very quirky and well written.

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The Gruffalo's Child 2011-08-13 10:40:54 Laura Coleman 2
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3.0
Reviewed by oz mum    August 13, 2011
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Good follow up, but nothing beats the original!

This is a really good sequel to the original Gruffalo with a similarly clever story and so well done. Be warned though, my (then 3 year old when we got it) was TERRIFIED of the mouse's shadow!! No wonder the gruffalo was scared!!! (she loves it now though I hasten to add!)

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The Gruffalo's Child 2011-06-29 12:03:37 Victoria Beale
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4.0
Reviewed by Victoria    June 29, 2011
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The Gruffalo's Child

As an English child, I was taught to read with now classic story, "The Hungry Caterpillar".

30 years later, I believe a generation of children will learn to read with "The Gruffalo" and it's sequel, "The Gruffalo's Child". There is something very special, if not theatrical, about reading a story at bedtime, where the adult reader is as interested in hearing the end as the child.

There is a magical poetry in the original story which makes it impossible to put down. Whilst the sequel may follow a familiar theme, there is something wonderfully reassuring to discover the story of the Gruffalo's child. I recommend this book - without question these will become the Australian Classics of our time.

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